Ephemeral messaging applications are considered solutions for data protection and privacy concerns (Blink, And I’m Gone: E-Discovery Challenges and Considerations With Ephemeral Messaging).  However, courts are wary of ephemeral messaging applications given they can empower a litigant to avoid discovery obligations.  A recent decision from the District Court for the District of Arizona, details the consequences of using
Continue Reading Court Sends Signal to Parties Who Spoliated Documents Using Ephemeral Messages

In New York, it is widely recognized that the duty to preserve documents arises once a party “reasonably anticipates litigation” (see Voom HD Holdings LLC v EchoStar Satellite, 93 AD3d 33, 41-42 [1st Dept 2012]).  And so, issuing timely a litigation hold notice is critical for preserving information relevant or potentially relevant to an actual or threatened litigation.
Continue Reading Spoliation of Evidence: When a Litigation Hold is no Longer Privileged

Whether we like it or not, a reality of today’s world is that often important business is conducted by text messages. And so, when it is time to issue a litigation hold notice, you must include an instruction to preserve text messages as well as the devices from which they are sent/received (i.e., smartphones).  Your failure to do so can
Continue Reading Text Messages Must be Preserved

This is Part 2 in a multi-part blog discussing various core requirements that can serve as the road map to allow a lawyer to fulfill his/her duty of technological competence. [Click here to read Part 1]

2.  Implement Appropriate Preservation Procedures

ESI spoliation remains a real issue that lawyers must confront.  The best way to prevent spoliation is to take
Continue Reading A Lawyer’s Obligation to be Technologically Competent – Part 2

In past blogs, I have discussed the importance of issuing a litigation hold notice (“Hold”), as soon as a litigation is reasonably anticipated. I have also written about various best practices when drafting one’s Hold. [See Practical Tips For an Effective Litigation Hold Notice and Your Litigation Hold Must be Generally Broad And Specifically Tailored]. In an effort
Continue Reading Litigation Hold Notices Should Not Cloak the Recipient With Discretion Over What Documents to Preserve

In Eshelman v. Puma Biotechnology, Inc., No. 7:16-CV-18-D (E.D.N.C. June 7, 2017), Magistrate Judge Robert B. Jones, Jr., denied Plaintiff Eshelman’s motion seeking a jury instruction in response to Puma Biotechnology Inc.’s (“Puma”) failure to preserve (or identify in its litigation hold notice the need to preserve) internet web browser and search histories.  In denying Eshelman’s request, Judge Jones
Continue Reading Your Litigation Hold Must be Generally Broad And Specifically Tailored

According to the Complaint filed in Michael Distefano and Nicole Distefano v Law Offices of Barbara H. Katsos, PC and Barbara H. Katsos, Michael DiStefano and a non-party were owners of a limited liability company that was the franchisee of three Cold Stone Creamery Inc. ice cream parlors.  In 2006, the three stores suffered financial difficulties due to an extended


Continue Reading An Attorney Acting ‘With a Pure Heart and An Empty Head’ is Sanctioned for Spoliating Emails

It is the beginning of a new year and I thought it the ideal time to list out those steps that are absolutely critical when an attorney is confronting his/her obligation to produce e-discovery in connection with a litigation.  Bear in mind, the below list is not exhaustive and each step is replete with technical and tactical sub-steps and decisions. 


Continue Reading Critical Road Map for ESI in Litigation

We all know that it can be damaging to one’s case if a party to a litigation fails to preserve relevant information.  But when, exactly, does one’s duty to preserve (potentially relevant information) arise?  And what type of sanctions are federal courts imposing under the amended federal rules for preservation failures?

When Does One’s Duty to Preserve Arise?

Different jurisdictions


Continue Reading Failure to Preserve Emails Results in Sanctions

As most of those reading this are aware, companies/entities/agencies doing business in the US generally are not required to indefinitely preserve business records and information.  However, those companies/entities/agencies must preserve relevant information when a lawsuit or an investigation is reasonably anticipated. This duty stems from both the common law duty to prevent spoliation of evidence and certain state and federal


Continue Reading Southern District Reiterates the Critical Importance of Issuing a Litigation Hold and Grants Sanctions Against City and NYPD